Articles tagged with 'iOS'

  1. Respecting Accessibility in Custom View Controller Transitions
  2. 29 Jun

    There are many accessibility options available today in iOS. Such technologies are not only to help those users with vision impairment, but also those with physical disabilities and hearing problems. To Apple's credit, many of these technologies can be utilised in 3rd party apps without any work required on the developer's behalf. However, for some accessibility options it is the developer's responsibility to take extra care when building their apps to ensure that all users can take advantage of what their applications have to offer. Today we will focus on one such accessibility setting in particular: "Reduce Motion". Read more…

  3. Simplifying UICollectionView Usage With UICollectionView​DiffableDataSource
  4. 11 Dec

    Both UICollectionView and UITableView received significant updates at this year's WWDC, one of which was a new way to supply said views with the data that they display. This new data-providing functionality is afforded by two new classes - UICollectionView​DiffableDataSource and UITableView​DiffableDataSource. Most of the examples of using these new classes that Apple focussed on emphasised the benefits that apply to particularly complex collection and table views where the data being displayed is frequently changed, which in the past has been a source of headaches for developers when trying to update the view to match the new data. However, we also get worthwhile improvements to our code when using UICollectionView​DiffableDataSource for simple collection views whose data isn't frequently updated in complex ways. Read more…

  5. Supporting Dynamic Type with Custom Fonts on iOS
  6. 19 Oct

    One way in which designers look to imprint branding on an app is to use a custom typeface throughout the user interface. Whilst this can give an app a distinctive look, it often comes at the expense of accessibility. This is because a key element of iOS's support for visually impaired users is the Dynamic Type system, which allows users to increase or decrease the size of text rendered across the system. Whilst it is easy for apps to support Dynamic Type when using the built-in system typeface, doing so with a custom font requires additional dev effort which is all to often overlooked. Read more…

  7. iOS Dynamic Type Without the Dynamism
  8. 10 Oct

    Back in 2013 when Apple released iOS 7, they introduced a typographical system of semantically named fonts that allows app developers to produce text in their apps that is sized and weighted appropriately for any given context. Apps can specify what the text they display represents (a heading, title, body text etc) and iOS vends an appropriate font for the job. Read more…

  9. Supporting 3D Touch Application Shortcuts
  10. 4 Mar

    As discussed last week in Supporting 3D Touch "Peek and Pop", implementing hardware specific features is a great way to differentiate your app and support the iOS ecosystem: Read more…

  11. Supporting 3D Touch "Peek and Pop"
  12. 26 Feb

    Supporting specific hardware features that ship with iOS devices is one of the primary benefits of developing completely native applications. By taking advantage of the latest hardware that Apple ships you make your app in to a first-class citizen on the platform. When more applications take the time to utilise these new hardware components it acts as encouragement for users to upgrade their devices, which supports the whole iOS ecosystem. It is also a great way to make your applications stand out from the competition. Read more…

  13. Continuity for iPhone and iPad with Handoff
  14. 12 Feb

    Starting from where we left off last week (Continuity for Apple Watch and iPhone with Handoff) we will be adding Handoff support to our Counties sample application to allow transferring tasks between the iPhone and iPad. Before reading this post familiarise yourself with last week's as it provides the basis for the technique that will be discussed in this article. Read more…

  15. Continuity for Apple Watch and iPhone with Handoff
  16. 4 Feb

    Continuity was introduced with iOS 8 and Mac OS X Yosemite, and was primarily a method for first-party Apple applications to allow for transferring a task that was already in progress between an iOS device and a Mac. Very few third party appliations picked up support, so the feature only provided limited usability for most users. Read more…

  17. Indexing App Content with Core Spotlight
  18. 28 Jan

    The search functionality built in to iOS has for years been a weak point of the operating system, mainly due to being limited to only searching within first-party apps like Mail and Messages. This left the majority of users' content siloed in third-party applications, only to be retrieved by search functions included within those apps (if any). Read more…

  19. Modern View Layout on iOS 9
  20. 7 Jan

    In iOS 6 Apple released Auto Layout, which gave developers a declarative API for laying out user interfaces, saving us from hours of laborious and bug-prone setFrame: coding. Since then, Apple has added complementary technologies such as Size Classes and UIStackView to aid the development of adaptive user interfaces (see Adaptive User Interfaces with UIStackView). Developing interfaces that adjust gracefully to different sized devices as well as features like Split-Screen Multitasking would be practically impossible without Auto Layout, therefore any modern approach to developing user interfaces must be based on Auto Layout. Read more…

  21. Adaptive User Interfaces with UIStackView and UICollectionView
  22. 17 Dec

    Starting with iOS 8, Apple began encouraging developers to build "adaptive user interfaces" - interfaces that can happily scale from the iPhone 4s all the way up to much larger devices like the recently released iPad Pro. Technologies like Auto Layout made creating scalable interfaces much simpler, and iOS 8's UITraitCollection finally decoupled the device type (iPhone or iPad) from deciding how to layout an interface. With iOS 9, Apple introduced a new view class called UIStackView, which radically simplifies common layouts that would usually be accomplished with boiler-plate Auto Layout Constraints. This new view makes creating and maintaining interfaces much simpler as the nuts and bolts of Auto Layout are hidden away and the UI is described in a much higher-level, declarative manner. UIStackView also allows us to easily change our layout in order to be adaptive to size changes, as I will demonstrate with a small sample project that you can download here. Read more…